The Crayon Effect

January 15, 2017 No Comments »
The Crayon Effect

By Kelly Carr

carrThere’s nothing like a fresh box of crayons—preferably the box of 64, with rows of sharpened colors all lined up, vibrant and awaiting use. But if you were to go back to look at my box a few weeks later, there’d be noticeable differences.

The boldest colors will have gotten use: brick red, blue violet, burnt sienna. But carnation pink and the surrounding pink family? Barely touched. Only if absolutely necessary.

There’s some aversion I have to pink. (When my daughter was born, I pleaded with people not to fill our lives with pink gifts.) I can’t pinpoint the reason for my bias, but it’s there. Do you have similar feelings about your favorite and least favorite hues?

The crayon effect happens to the best of us in other areas of life as well. We may not realize when subconscious stereotypes cause us to lean toward one color and away from another. We might be doing our part to bring unity across the spectrum of colors God created—then some negative thought creeps into our minds, and we realize there are deep-seated assumptions we aren’t even aware of, residing in the corners of our minds.

As God’s church I pray that our hearts break when people of any race or ethnicity are hurting. When we don’t understand at first, may we take the time to ask questions and strive to learn what trials and tribulations people are experiencing. Let’s seek to see another perspective. May we talk less and listen more before we form opinions. And when we are hurting, we will receive such kindness in return.

“There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to one hope when you were called; one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all” (Ephesians 4:4-6).

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